Administrative Conference Announces Publication of the Second Edition of the Sourcebook of United States Executive Agencies

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Harry M. Seidman
202.480.2085
hseidman@acus.gov
Administrative Conference Announces Publication of the Second Edition of the Sourcebook of United States Executive Agencies

The Administrative Conference of the United States is pleased to announce the publication of the second edition of the Sourcebook of United States Executive Agencies. Originally published in 2012, the Sourcebook examines and catalogues the departments, agencies, and other organizational entities that comprise the federal executive establishment. The Sourcebook has proven an invaluable resource on the structure, organization, and design of federal administrative agencies to all three branches of government.

The second edition covers developments since the first edition’s publication and expands its coverage to include bureaus within agencies, accounts for constitutional debates about agency structure, and addresses the renewed importance of “government-wide legal mandates” in the administrative state.

Jennifer L. Selin, a Kinder Institute Assistant Professor of Constitutional Democracy at the University of Missouri, and David E. Lewis, Chair of the Department of Political Science at Vanderbilt University, served as the authors of this important project.

About ACUS

The Administrative Conference of the United States is an independent federal agency dedicated to improving the administrative process through consensus-driven applied research and providing nonpartisan expert advice and recommendations for federal agency procedures. Its membership is composed of senior federal officials, academics, and other experts from the private sector. Except for the Chairman, all Conference Members are unpaid.

The Conference is committed to promoting effective public participation and efficiency in the rulemaking process by leveraging interactive technologies and encouraging open communication with the public as well as making improvements to the regulatory process by reducing unnecessary litigation, and improving the use of science and the effectiveness of applicable laws.

Learn more at www.acus.gov.