Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) (Recommendations)

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The Parallel Table of Statutory Authorities and Rules (2 CFR ch. I) should be an accurate and complete listing of United States Code provisions cited as rulemaking authority in executive agency documents which prescribe general and permanent rules. The present Parallel Table is deficient. Agencies have not given sufficient time and attention to citing proper authorities and...

The manual at present falls short of its goal because the narrative text submitted by some of the agencies is outdated, unrevealing, cumbersome, or otherwise deficient. The text should be rewritten at a high level of competence.

Recommendation

1. Each agency covered by 5 U.S.C. 552 should assign the writing of material for the “U.S. Government...

This draft recommendation will be discussed at the April 7, 2014, meeting of the Committee on Collaborative Governance.

Recommendation 2014-1, "Resolving FOIA Disputes Through Targeted ADR Strategies," addresses more effective use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) approaches to help resolve disputes arising under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).  The OPEN Government Act of 2007 created the Office of Government Information Services (OGIS), a part of the National Archives and Records Administration,...

This recommendation examines the obligation of agencies to index and make their adjudicatory decisions available to the public.

The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) imposes numerous affirmative disclosure obligations on agencies. Under 5 U.S.C. 552(a)(2), each agency, in accordance with...

Recommendation 1(a) parallels part A of Recommendation 88-10. It starts with the premise the basic policy balances have already been struck and does not seek to reopen them. Existing policy reflected in the records statutes2 and in National...

The rapid evolution of computer technology raises many economic and policy issues that affect the acquisition and release of information by government agencies. New information technologies can improve public access to public information and reduce paperwork burdens. They can also impose significant economic burdens, however, and they may stimulate...

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